MBA Students at UNR Rub Elbows with World-Class Business Professionals

Experienced Businessmen Alan Deutschman and Dick Bostdorff provided their expertise to MBA students at UNR's School of Business

Experienced Businessmen Alan Deutschman and Dick Bostdorff provided their expertise to MBA students at UNR's School of Business

Northern Nevadans have a big reason to take pride in the MBA program at UNR.  For the fourth year in a row, the Princeton Review has recognized the program in its "Best Business Schools" guidebook.  The ranking is based on data from the school as well as feedback from business students.  In addition, Bloomberg BusinessWeek recently ranked the part-time MBA program at UNR as the fourth best in the nation.

University of Nevada MBA student Zach Yeager

University of Nevada MBA student Zach Yeager

That's believed to be the highest ranking of any graduate program in the history of the Nevada System of Higher Education.  The part-time program outranked those at prestigious schools such as Rice University, Villanova and UC Berkeley.

Students gave the professors in the program high marks, and said they particularly liked the case-study and team-oriented approach to learning business.  MBA student Zach Yeager described the program this way:  "The MBA program is successful because it  has instructors who care about what they teach, and the students are motivated to learn.  When you combine great instructors with motivated students, the result is an exceptional classroom experience."

Visiting faculty member Richard Bostdorff teaches a class on Leadership and Organizational change.  Bostdorff has a long resume of business expertise, ranging from his years merging Pacific Bell and SBC, to his time as COO of Nevada Bell.  He also led the merger of transportation giants DHL and Airborne Express, which was truly a global integration.  Bostdorff believes in using real-life case studies to teach business students to think critically and outside the box.  He also keeps the class current by bringing in other business leaders.  Earlier this year he brought in guest speaker Alan Deutschman to talk about the role of leaders in creating change.

Alan Deutschman, acclaimed journalist, speaker and expert on Apple's Steve Jobs speaks to MBA students at UNR

Alan Deutschman, acclaimed journalist, speaker and expert on Apple's Steve Jobs speaks to MBA students at UNR

Deutschman is a nationally acclaimed writer and speaker, and an expert on Steve Jobs who was the subject of his latest book:  "The Second Coming of Steve Jobs."  Deutschman is also the Professor, Reynolds Chair of Business Journalism at UNR.  During the class, he focused on well-known companies, and their leaders.  Examples included Jeff Bezos at Amazon, who makes customer service a priority.  Deutschman also analyzed the success of companies like Apple, FedEx and Google.

Along with a strong faculty and curriculum, the Business School has several other notable strengths.  One is its historic relationship with regional employers, and the maintaining of a career services office.  That office provides counseling and resources for students tho help them find jobs in their chosen profession.

Maybe that's why business students rave about the program.  Graduate student Yeager says the class allows UNR students to thrive in a challenging environment.  "Dick's class is special because he adapts it based on the knowledge, experience and interests of the students," he said.  He trusts his students to take control of their own education," he added.

This is just one class among many at the Business School.  But it's easy to see why the part-time MBA program is ranked as one of the top in the nation; and one in which we can all take a great deal of pride.

Sympathy, Support Flow into Local Newsroom

JK Metzker with his sons

JK Metzker with his sons

Newsrooms are competitive places.  Each news station driven to out-scoop the others and get the big story.  When KTVN Sportscaster JK Metzker was killed while crossing the street near UNR, all that flew out the window.  "I can't begin to express the gratitude we have for our friends in the local media – television, newspaper and radio," said KTVN News Director Jason Pasco.  "It's just incredible how everyone put competition aside to rally together to help us through that difficult time," he continued.

Indeed, competitors Channel 4 and Channel 8 stepped forward and offered to help cover stories for KTVN if necessary, and share the video.  Fox 11 and KNPB also offered support.  The Reno Gazette Journal stepped forward.  And the list goes on.  That just never happens in normal times.

KOLO Sports Anchor Josh Little produced a story about JK Metzker for KTVN, something that's almost unheard of in the news business

KOLO Sports Anchor Josh Little produced a story about JK Metzker for KTVN, something that's almost unheard of in the news business

The amount of e-mail, flowers and cards that poured into the Channel 2 newsroom is truly amazing.  "All of us are overwhelmed by the outpouring of sympathy and support from this community," said Pasco.  E-mails came from here and from around the country; from people who never even knew JK personally.

But JK Metzker is the type of person who makes others feel good about themselves.  Always had time for a smile, a quick joke or comment– to ease the stress of working in the fast-paced business of news.  Friends and co-workers alternated between tears and laughter as they remembered JK, while also trying to do their jobs.

Flowers, cards and e-mails flowed into the Channel 2 newsroom following the death of JK Metzker

Flowers, cards and e-mails flowed into the Channel 2 newsroom following the death of JK Metzker

Sports directors from Michigan, and Louisiana sent condolences.  Viewers expressed dismay and sympathy.  Local casinos, businesses and individuals sent cards and letters. Former co-workers from all the local channels got back in touch to say they were so sorry.  Calls and e-mails came from local officials:  The Washoe County sheriff, the district attorney, the school district, and even the Governor.  Too many to mention, but all appreciated.

Then, on the day of JK's funeral, the Caughlin fire broke out, sending thousands of people out of their homes and into shelters.  Suddenly homeowners were wondering if they had lost everything.

The Caughlin Fire broke out the day of JK's funeral and changed everyone's plans

The Caughlin Fire broke out the day of JK's funeral and changed everyone's plans

The funeral went on as planned, but many at Channel 2 couldn't attend.  People needed information about the fire.  The news department rushed into action, staying on the air non-stop for 18 hours, with no commercials.  And the amazing thing is, some of the people who came to Reno for the funeral offered, instead, to cover the fire and bring much-needed information to the viewers who were in the path of the flames.  Shocking!  Heartwarming.

It shows you how, when the chips are down and fire is racing down our local canyons, we pull together.  When a beloved friend, father and companion dies, people reach out.

It's hard to describe;  the feelings of sadnesses, combined with the outpouring of support and concern.  "It's what makes Northern Nevada such a great place to call home," says Pasco.  And his friends say it all would have made JK smile.

Growing up in Northern Nevada Teaches Teenager About Life

Learning to drive the antique tractor in Fallon, Nevada

Learning to drive the antique tractor in Fallon, Nevada

Guest Post by Amanda Gallop

In a big city like New York or Boston, a seven year old driving a tractor is a rare and strange sight.  But in a tiny town in the Nevada desert, this sight was about as common as seeing vultures perched on fence posts.  I think that everyone can agree that the place they grew up has had huge impact on their lives. For me, that place was Fallon, Nevada, complete with family-owned shops, cows, horses, and farmland, lots and lots of farmland.  This is a completely different world compared to the skyscrapers and cramped living of big cities, and I believe this has shaped me as a person.

One aspect of this life that has shaped me was living on a 20 acre homestead.  Every morning I would get up, help my dad feed our animals (two dogs, three horses, two ponies, and three cats), and then proceed to get ready for school, where there were eleven kids in my fourth grade.  On weekends, instead of going to the mall like kids in other cities might have done, I mainly helped my family with work around the house and on the property.  Helping repair fences and irrigate fields were not uncommon chores for me. Not only was I doing chores, but I was also studying the Roman Empire, Alexander the Great, and the Magna Carta in school.

Bonding with our Nevada Mustang in Fallon

Bonding with our Nevada Mustang in Fallon

Another aspect about my past that has shaped me is how small our community was.  For most people, going to the neighbor's house means walking to the house right next door.  For me, that meant putting on sneakers, walking across dirt roads, through fields, and across a stream until I finally reached the closest house.  Being an only child, this was worth it just to see someone who was two years older than me, so I think this has caused me to be very independent.

Arriving at school on my horse

Arriving at school on my horse

One of my best memories is the time I rode my horse to school.  We were reading Little House on the Prairie, and I asked my dad if I could ride my horse the two and a half miles to school. To my surprise, he said yes. I still remember trotting my horse down the road and into the gravel parking lot at my school. I jumped off, gave the reins to my dad and went to class.

All in all, from the 100 student K-12 school to the 20 acres of adventure that I grew up on, all the aspects of my neighborhood and early life have shaped me as a person and made me who I am today… ready for adventure.

Rotary Clubs Train Local Teens to be Future Leaders

Northern Nevada 8th graders learn to work as a team during the Rotary Youth Leadership program

Northern Nevada 8th graders learn to work as a team during the Rotary Youth Leadership program

How do you take a bunch of teenagers and teach them to be leaders?  The Rotary Middle School Leadership Program seems to have figured it out.  Rotary clubs from around Northern Nevada asked teachers and principals from 18 different schools to hand-pick five teens from their 8th grade classes and hand them over to professional leadership trainers for two weekends.  During that time they practiced team-building, decision-making, and even had some fun.

Joe Donohue, the co-director of the Rotary Camp Youth Leadership Awards program, says it's a great way to reach teens.  "The kids on day-one are like any other group of teens who don't know each other.  They don't make eye contact with each other or with us.  The last day they're the best of friends," said Donohue.  They also learn that when they take care of others, it comes back to them.

Donohue says Rotary sponsors the program because they believe it's the best thing for kids– who one day will help run our community.  "Middle school is a very difficult time, so we give them some skills so they can make choices, so that they wind up being community leaders," he said.

Recent participants in the Rotary Middle School Leadership program at John Ascuaga's Nugget in Sparks

Recent participants in the Rotary Middle School Leadership program at John Ascuaga's Nugget in Sparks

Eighth graders from Reno, Sparks, Fernley, Fallon and Yerington were hand-picked by their teachers to participate in the program.  They interacted with with facilitators and each other to explore their leadership potential and then put it into practice.

Donohue says the goal is to encourage positive thinking.  "There is a basic change in thinking that takes place with the kids, that has to do with how they view tasks."

The Rotary Youth Leadership Program uses a Ropes Course to teach teamwork

The Rotary Youth Leadership Program uses a Ropes Course to teach teamwork

"Kids will say 'I have to go to school today, I have to do this, I have to do that.'"  The facilitators don't let them say that during the program.  They have them say "I get to."

For example, they'll ask the teens to say "I get to go to school tomorrow, I get to go to this meeting, I get to do my homework."  "We want them to see that there is another way of operating," said Donohue.

"It makes the kids enthusiastic about who they are and what they're doing, and the world," Donohue added.

What did the teens think of the program?  On the last day, each participant had to get up in front of parents, teachers and their peers and talk briefly about what they learned.  They used words like courage, risk, leadership, as they thanked their facilitators.  They also bonded with the volunteer counselors who come from local high schools and gave up two weekends to work with the middle school students.

Local teens learn to trust each other at the Rotary Youth Leadership Program

Local teens learn to trust each other at the Rotary Youth Leadership Program

The goal next year is to involve more teens from the rural areas, so they can experience the program, and learn to lead.

As one eighth grader put it, "I learned how to open up to people that I had no idea who they are and I learned how to push myself, and get out of my comfort zone."  That sounds like the first steps in becoming a leader.  Kudos to our area Rotary Clubs for caring, and for putting their resources toward our future leaders.

Pumpkin Patch Postcard

I recently stopped by Ferrari Farm Corn Maze and Pumpkin Patch on the corner of Rock and Mill to get a taste of autumn; the kind of experience that's filled with Cornstalks, kids, families and baby farm animals.  The weather was perfect.  Full sun, blue sky and a hint of Fall in the air.

Pumpkins for the picking at Reno's Ferrari Farm Pumpkin Patch

Pumpkins for the picking at Reno's Ferrari Farm Pumpkin Patch

A youngster takes an imaginary ride on the tractor at Ferrari Farm in Reno

A youngster takes an imaginary ride on the tractor at Ferrari Farm in Reno

A perfect Nevada day.  There were families picking out pumpkins, kids riding a big tractor and checking out the animals.

One toddler saw a baby pig and said "Doggie!"  His mom gently coached him in the proper identification of swine versus canine.

Petting the farm animals at Ferrari Farm in Reno

Checking out the baby animals at Ferrari Farm in Reno

The joy in the faces of kids as they raced around the farm was wonderful to see, and it took me back to when we used to take our daughter to Lattin Farms in Fallon.

One day we got lost in the Corn Maze and had to ask one of the volunteers to help us find our way out.  We made scarecrows and then the best part of all:  choosing a pumpkin.

A baby pig at Ferrari Farm in Reno

A baby pig at Ferrari Farm in Reno

Picking just the right pumpkin is an art.  You have to imagine the face you'll carve.  Will it be round?  Or tall and skinny.  Does it need to be perfect?  Or are blemishes part of the overall plan?  Sometimes a dent becomes the perfect scar on a Jack-o-lantern.

And it's fun to get up close and personal with baby pigs, goats… and some type of hairy animal I couldn't quite identify.

Ferrari Farm has been in business for as long as I can remember, and the family grows everything on location.  I love driving by on my way to work and seeing the huge cardboard bins– still in the fields, filled to the brim with pumpkins.

So if you're ready for a small diversion, visit a pumpkin patch.  Even if you're not planning to carve a pumpkin, it'll bring a smile to your face.

World-class Kids Museum Opens in Reno

A crowd gathers for the opening of the Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum in downtown Reno

A crowd gathers for the opening of the Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum in downtown Reno

Actress Dawn Wells of Gilligan's Island fame led the chant of "open the doors" Saturday morning as a crowd cheered the opening of the Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum in downtown Reno.

Actress Dawn Wells and Volunteer Amanda Gallop at the opening of the Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum

Actress Dawn Wells and Volunteer Amanda Gallop at the opening of the Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum

Then, volunteers flung open the doors and parents and kids streamed into the shiny new lobby, and on to the exhibits that awaited them.  Soon kids of all ages were playing on the Truckee River, sailing small boats on Lake Tahoe and climbing toward the sky on the cloud climber.  Everywhere you could see smiles, laughter and positive energy.

Painting on the glass wall in Da Vinci's Corner is one of the most popular activities Reno's new DIscovery Museum

Painting on the glass wall in Da Vinci's Corner is one of the most popular activities Reno's new DIscovery Museum

The Nevada Discovery Museum has been years in the making.  And parents are glad to have something that will engage and excite their children.  Here are some of the things I overheard while touring around the exhibit spaces.  I heard a little girl tell her sister, "Take me to the clouds!"   A teenager said to her friends, "I wish they had this when I was little."

A mom said to one of the staff, "This place is fantastic!."  It must be fun to work in a place where people smile all the time.

On opening morning, my 13 year-old daughter and I served as volunteers putting wristbands on children and adults just after they paid their admission.  Everyone was in a great mood.  The staff smile too and seem to really enjoy what they do.  And why not?

Kids can steer their own boat as they learn about Lake Tahoe and the Truckee River at the Nevada Discovery Museum

Kids can steer their own boat as they learn about Lake Tahoe and the Truckee River at the Nevada Discovery Museum

Every once in awhile we had the chance to walk around and watch kids interacting with the exhibits.

The magic of the Discovery Museum is that parents also get  a chance to interact with their children in a positive creative way.  Parents get to re-live their days of painting, building, exploring and making music.  The Nevada Stories exhibit gives them a chance to tell their kids about what it was like when they were kids.  It opens dialog that often doesn't take place when you're racing to get somewhere or trying to get dinner on the table.

The Nevada Discovery Museum really has something for everyone.  It's taken years of hard work by many people.  And it has the ability to attract families who might not otherwise visit our area.   Congratulations and thanks for bringing a bright spot to Northern Nevada.

Life at the Governor's Mansion: First Kids Make their Beds, Everyone Pitches In

Nevada's First Family Poses with the Easter Bunny at the Governor's Mansion in Carson City

Nevada's First Family Poses with the Easter Bunny at the Governor's Mansion in Carson City

After eight months as first family, Governor Brian Sandoval, his wife Kathleen, and their three children have settled into their new home at the governor's mansion in Carson City.  Recently I sat down with the first lady to find out about life in the mansion, and how she juggles family, the kids' school, her career and the commute to Reno where she works as a program director at the Children's Cabinet.

"I don't sleep much," she laughs.  "But when you love what you're doing, it makes it easier to juggle it all."  The Sandovals have three children, James, a sophomore at Bishop Manogue High School, Maddy, a freshman at Manogue and Marisa who starts second grade this week in Reno.  That makes for a lively household.

My first question:  Who cooks?  Her answer again comes with a smile,  "Sometimes I cook, sometimes Brian cooks.  We try to plan it in advance, but a lot of times it's just your typical family where, who knows when anyone's going to be  home for dinner."  I asked if the mansion is starting to feel more like home.  The answer is yes.  There are a few things to get used to, like the white carpet that covers most of the floors in the historic residence.  "That is a huge challenge for us with three kids and four dogs."

Marisa and Maddy Sandoval

Marisa and Maddy Sandoval

LIFE AS A FAMILY

The Sandovals have a small staff at the mansion, but there's no chef and no housekeeper.  To keep things running smoothly, everyone has to pitch in.  Do the kids have chores?  Absolutely.  "They're responsible for putting their laundry away, cleaning their rooms and doing their dishes just like anybody else," says the first mom.  And they have to make their beds.  (Editor's note: That question came from my thirteen year-old daughter, who is convinced that life in the governor's mansion is a piece of cake, and that there's no bed-making.)

Internet?  Yes if it's school related.  No TV during the week, no video games.  They have a set bedtime, and homework comes first.

Governor Brian Sandoval with his son James who recently learned to drive

Governor Brian Sandoval with his son James who recently got his driver's license

James recently got his driver's license, so he helps with the drive to high school.  That leaves Kathleen to make the commute to work and to take her youngest daughter to school in Reno.  Time with friends takes some effort too.  "Their school friends are in Reno.  You can't just say I want to go to a friend's house, and be there in fifteen minutes.  It requires more planning."

How has all this changed them?  "I think it's matured them a bit," says Sandoval.  "In terms of their friends, they don't really treat them any different.  I think that's been good for them."  And like typical teenagers, the older two still see their dad as just part of the family.  "When they're mad at their dad, and they hear all the nice things people say about him, they're like 'Oh my gosh, they don't have to live with him.' "

It seems every day brings something different.  Sandoval recalls the time one of her staff members called about her youngest daughter's toys.  The staffer said, "We saw your office  and it's covered with Barbies, do you want us to pick it up?"  Her response?  "I said no, Marisa has to pick it up."

LIFE AS FIRST LADY

As first lady, Kathleen Sandoval gets many requests to appear at events around the state.  Because she works full time, she has to choose carefully and can't say yes to everything.  "My kids are my first priority and we made a goal that their lives would be as normal as possible," she says.  "I really focus on events that have to do with youth and children, I make them a priority to attend, because that's my passion."

Kathleen Sandoval has a soft spot for kids.  Her own, and the ones she meets at the Children's Cabinet in Reno.  She has two goals as first lady of Nevada, to bring resources and attention to fight substance abuse and improve mental health.  "To look at what other states are doing in terms of those issues, how they're dealing with the impact of not having resources and how we can bring more resources to our state."    She's seen some progress in both areas, but there's a long way to go.  One of the benefits of being first lady is that people listen.  "It has given me the ability to get people's ears and to really make an impact and pull people together."

Kathleen Sandoval with mural artists Darryl Helton and Jordan Bird at Children's Cabinet in Reno

Kathleen Sandoval with mural artists Darryl Helton and Jordan Bird at Children's Cabinet in Reno

Sandoval says the economy has had an impact on families in all parts of Nevada.  "Lack of stability; we're seeing more families having to access the food bank or needing rental assistance.  So their lives are more in upheaval and it's more difficult for kids."  These are issues she sees first-hand in her work as Director of the Family and Youth Intervention program at Children's Cabinet.

OPTIMISM ABOUT THE FUTURE

There are reasons for optimism though, and at the Children's Cabinet, the first lady is actively pursuing grants and using collaboration with other agencies to bring more services to young people.  "One of the things that is great for our youth is that there are a lot of different options for education, so if they don't fit into the traditional school, they have more options than they used to," she says, noting that everyone has had to be more creative in this economy.

Even at the governor's mansion there are not as many resources as there used to be.  The first family has cut back on staff, but Sandoval says one of the biggest surprises about living at the mansion is the bonding that has happened between her family and the remaining staff, including the four trustees who come from the state correctional centers.  The trustees are non-violent DUI offenders who help set up events at the mansion and take care of the grounds.  "They've been very open about talking about what's happened to them, and the impact it's had on their lives," she says.  "That's been a great education for my two older kids."

First Lady Kathleen Sandoval with her children James, Maddy and Marisa at Lake Tahoe

First Lady Kathleen Sandoval with her children James, Maddy and Marisa at Lake Tahoe

GRATITUDE

It's apparent that despite all the multi-tasking, the first lady is grateful for the opportunity to serve the people of Nevada.  Her children have a chance to meet many people and see their state in a way that not many others do.  "I'm lucky that all my kids are very giving and I think they'll continue to develop that and to develop understanding of others."  They've also had to develop a thicker skin.  "They see their dad in the newspaper and some negative things– you have to get a thick skin," she says.

Many people think that being governor means you live like royalty, but Sandoval says, in reality they're like many families in the Silver State.  "I think that's a difference about us being a family and being in the governor's mansion– is that we are a typical working family and that we worry about what everybody else worries about, making ends meet and paying our bills."  She mentions that they returned $40 thousand dollars to the general fund last year from money that was budgeted for the mansion.  "Our goal was to use as little money as possible," she says.

Sandoval says she has learned to roll with the punches and stay calm when things get really hectic.  "It takes a lot for me to get completely stressed out.  I'm able to let things roll off my back and keep things in perspective."  That definitely shows as the phone rings in her office and people pop-in several times during our interview.

What surprised me most in talking with the first lady — other than her ability to laugh at the craziness of it all, is her confession that she maintains control over the family's washing machine.  "Nobody puts laundry in the washer except for me, because we had a little white coming out pink," she laughs.  That may seem like a small thing, but we wouldn't want the Governor greeting dignitaries in pink shirts.

Discovery Museum Fuels Kids' Curiosity

Six year old Kaitlyn Turner puts rocks made of foam into the mining rig at the new Terry Lee Wells Discovery Museum in Reno

Six year old Kaitlyn Turner puts rocks made of foam into the mining rig at the new Terry Lee Wells Discovery Museum in Reno

They say the cure for boredom is curiosity.  Toddlers and young children rarely get bored, but they do get curious.  They draw on walls with markers, unroll the toilet paper and engage in all manner of discovery, as we smile patiently and clean up the mess.  Soon they'll be able to channel all that energy at a new museum designed just for kids.  The Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum is preparing for its grand opening on September 10th, and recently I took a behind-the-scenes tour of the 67-thousand square foot building which is being transformed into a space for fun and creativity.

There's plenty to get excited about, including hands-on exhibits featuring art, science, history, solar energy and health.  There's even an exhibit on flight.

"It's a place for families to come together and learn," says Patrick Turner, marketing manager for the Museum.  And it's something families in Northern Nevada have been asking for.  "They're looking forward to having a hub to come to in the evenings and on weekends and do stuff that's fun, but also stuff that helps kids learn," he said.

The Cloud Climber exhibit is one of the highlights at Reno's new Discovery Museum

The Cloud Climber exhibit is one of the highlights at Reno's new Discovery Museum

As we walked around the museum and looked at the progress, I had two thoughts: One, there seems to be something for everyone; and two, I wish they had built this ten years ago when my daughter was little.

The Museum occupies the old City Hall building on Center Street in downtown Reno.  The 18-thousand square foot exhibit hall is divided into galleries designed for children of different ages and tastes.

DaVinci's Corner explores the world of art, and encourages children to use their imagination by combining art and science through hands-on projects and exhibits.

There's even a place for very little kids called Little Discoveries, where they can explore, build things and pretend, all in a safe space that's separated from the big kids.

Installing a Bristlecone Pine tree at the Terry Lee Wells Discovery Museum in downtown Reno

Installing a Bristlecone Pine tree at the Terry Lee Wells Discovery Museum in downtown Reno

The Nevada Stories gallery showcases our state's history, but also reveals how environment, culture and industry have shaped our cities and communities.  One of the best ideas is the electric horse.

The museum has been a labor of love and more importantly, a collaborative effort.  "There are so many organizations, individuals and major donors from the community involved," says Turner.  The space is designed to welcome school groups, community groups and parties.  It even has a kitchen for cooking classes.  There's a parking lot with 100 spaces.  Important when you're hauling kids and all their stuff around.

A Family Membership to the museum is $85 per year, which gives you unlimited access whenever the museum is open.  Daily admission is also available.

The Nevada Discovery Museum has a website and a Facebook page, where you can find out more information about the programs and the grand opening on September 10th.  Local businesses like Renown Children's Hospital are holding drawings for free memberships.  You can visit the Museum's Facebook page to find out more, or call the museum at  775-786-1000.

The dream of a full scale children's museum in Reno has become a reality.  Thanks to the work of many, the Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discover Museum is ready to engage the children of Northern Nevada, California and visitors from far and wide.